Get Involved

Get Involved

It is a little over 15 years since the guns fell silent in Northern Uganda following the signing of peace talks between the government and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) rebels in the Southern Sudan capital, Juba. But the scars are still fresh for many victims of the 20-year war. Most of these survivors used to reside with relatives or friends but major problems piled up upon their return to their homes in the villages where immediate survival needs formally catered for by national, international and non-governmental organizations were withdrawn. Survivors begun facing very difficult conditions with no special attention being given to their emotional and psychological needs. In light of the above, our establishment is needed to equip the majority of survivors in this post war-ravaged Northern Uganda cope with their emotional, psycho-social and economic needs.

 

EONS-GOATS
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The Project benefitted 15 youths with disabilities comprising of both survivors (amputees) and other physical disabilities and one Intellectual disability. There were 8 females and 7 females.  Each recipient received two (2) female goats apiece. 

Uganda Youth Development Link (UYDEL) a national non-governmental organization enhancing the socio-economic transformation of disadvantaged young people aged 10 -24 years through evidence-based interventions donated to us Uganda Shillings Five Million Eight Hundred Ninety-Four Thousand Six Hundred Seventy-Four. (UGX. 5,894,674/=) only.

The targeted youth project sought to promote challenged athletes participation in a program that will transform people with disabilities lives from peasant subsistence survival to viable self-reliance with reduced vulnerability and dependence on external assistance. Our mode of operation is demand-driven with a focus on transferring knowledge, skills and tools to improve increase food security, nutrition, health and incomes of rural communities.

Because crop production in our community provides only seasonal employment in a rainfed production system.; whereas rearing goats would provide employment and incomes as a subsidiary occupation. The basic principles of economics in goat farming are based on smaller size, costs less than cattle, require less feeds, present fewer risks, and have quick return (there is quick pay of dues because of fast multiplication and early maturity). Ideally goats require much lower investments and facilities in terms of housing, feed, labour and health care.  

The project is also investing in Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) for the youth membership effective February 12, 2022.

Sports activities and other recreational activities will continue to unite the membership as youth continue the fight against alcohol, drug abuse and substance use in the community.

The International Campaign to Ban Landmines and Cluster Munition is a huge success! Article 5 Mine Ban Treaty obligations, Mine Clearance achieved by Republic of Uganda coinciding with the Twelfth Meeting of States Parties (12MSP) December 2012.

46 mined areas covering 1.6km2 clearance operations found and destroyed 4,314 antipersonnel mines, 42 air bombs and 15 UXO. Additional 9,273 UXO and 20 antivehicle mine destroyed during operations.

Unfortunately, the total number of mine/ERW casualties in Uganda is not known. Estimates by December 2016, put it at 2,792 casualties (533 killed; 2,259 injured). 14 casualties were registered by December 2016. A recent study we carried out August to October 2021, disclosed a 69 year old lady injuries leading to right leg amputation.

As long as mines infest nations countless casualties leading to death, injuries, disabilities, destructions, mourning, and millions of dollars spent of reconstructions instead of sustainable global development.

Victim assistance enshrined in the two instruments of international humanitarian law, The Mine Ban Treaty (MBT) and the Convention on Cluster Munitions (CCM) remains the Achilles heels Uganda is yet to overcome.

Republic of Uganda is feeling like the Pearl of Africa again thanks to the International Campaign to Ban Landmines and Cluster Munition with generous support of affluent donors worldwide.

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Some survivors remain in dire need for routine medical rehabilitation and treatment begging for government to again prioritize budget allocation towards the orthopedic departments. Something like insurance card specifically for survivors to get professionally help from trained surgeons and not just general medical practioners.

what-is-happening-advocacy
stories of women survivors
p2

“I am 27 years old and believe my whole life is still for me to make. I cannot ask government to pay back my lost limb or messed up life. What am interested in however, is implore the government to critically evaluate the victim assistance clause enshrined in the International Mine Ban Treaty, which I was told obligates the State to look kindly on our affairs. I want to be able to use my hands, work, earn and put food in my family’s table. My children should be able to go to school beyond my level of education since my predicament prohibited me. “ 

Lost right foot and a baby brother riding on her back at 5 years from devastating landmines blast. Only started school thanks to a missionary benefactor who met her school dues primary through form three since her parents were equally wrestled down living in Internally Displaced Peoples (IDPs) camp early 2000s. Dropped out of school and would soon succumb to the pressure of being a girl-child experiencing so much withdrawn support. Found a young man and started a family. Regrettably, she separated last year and returned home with two children, boy 7 and girl 4 to live with widowed mother. Tilling the ground at a peasantry scale while eking a living.

Loss a limb an infant, five (5) years old going to fetch water at the well.  After successful surgery and other medical rehabilitation, was able to walk with the help of artificial limb provided by the Hospital.

Parents took her to boarding school because they desired quality education for her.  Recently completed Uganda Certificate of Education (U.C.E) at Koro Secondary School. Currently home helping family in the garden during this pandemic. Desire to join a vocational skills training in order to learn a trade that will provide occupation for future.

Growing up with limb loss was not so discomfiting in terms of her social life since her families, peers at school and community wholly accepted her the way she was.  She is hoping that she will be able to continue living positive even as she prepares to encounter uncharted territories entering adulthood. Disability and segregation she never had to face but has heard persons with disabilities express pain of discrimination.

 

p2

“It is not up to me, but my appeal to our government is to consider lending survivors of explosive ordnances and landmines a helping hand to cope with the difficult past we have gone through. “

education of girls survivors
artificial limb making
p2

“I appeal to government to improve on budget allocation to this orthopedic department so that prosthesis is available for replacement for survivors and new amputees we keep receiving from other causes.

I am currently renting in town proximal to work place but I do not own any piece of land or house where I can farm or retire to while on leave, holidays or host visiting in-laws.

We are pleased that the prosthesis keeps us upright but lost past cannot be forgotten until government can openly come and compensate us with land and some capital to start off a better living.”

People who recover psychologically from the traumatic accident move from pragmatic acceptance to what we call acceptance with resilience.  In contrast, people who do not recover psychologically from the traumatic accident move from pragmatic acceptance to what we term acceptance with resignation. They are resigned to the limb loss; feel depressed and bad about themselves. We have a handful of trained counselors who have had success handling high levels of trauma experienced from their peer in the community. Evidence of the resilience demonstrated by these survivors who accepted a fate of living without a limb and not committing suicide or going into depression is a vital indicator for our  confidence. These ones have become ably roles models and change makers for those who are weak and for new  cases of amputees struggling with accepting life of disability.

Henry an amputee himself, working with a Team of Technicians making, repairing and replacing artificial limbs (Prosthesis) enabling every patients is afforded a pair shoes when they receive services at Gulu Regional Referral Hospital.

Double amputee survivor wheels the streets of Anaka Town Northern Uganda to do welding and Fabrications in one of his workshops. Prior to Oscar’s accident, life was normal for the Family. At 18 years of age, while going home from the Internally Displaced Peoples camp in Olwyio, present day Nwoya district, Although it was 37 years ago last February 2, 2002 he remembers the way his life transformed then as intensely as though it happened yesterday.

Oscar opened the first welding workshop in Anaka Town in 2015, when there was no electricity. He trained over 70 youths who were on drugs, theft, hooliganism and transformed their lives over the past 6 years. Every wielding workshop owner in Anaka town was once his student making him a respectable figure in the industry. He owns two workshops where a couple of young men in Anaka town and Olwiyo Centre are employed. Oscar was elected a Councilor III Representative of Persons with Disabilities Olwiyo Sub County in the recently concluded general election 2021. He is ably looking after his family with returns from his different trades and engagement

p2

“A few years ago names of survivors were written down across Acholi Sub region with the hope of our plight being addressed by government. Twice these records were submitted to respectable personalites in government but attempt to get credible feedback were futile.”

Yes, we are trying to move on with our lives thanks to the medical and psychological rehabilitation 20 years or so ago. Some of us have prosthesis, crutches, wheelchairs, others crawl, and most of these devices provided by Non-governmental Organisations.

double amputee wielding
housing for survivors
p2

“It is not up to me, but my appeal to our government is to consider lending survivors of explosive ordnances and landmines a helping hand to cope with the difficult past we have gone through. “

The twenty years of conflict in northern Uganda left devastated the infrastructure, economy, and psyche of the population. With the restoration of peace, most people returned to their homes, further supported by the Government of Uganda’s Peace, Recovery, and Development Plan (PRDP) – a comprehensive strategy to improve the welfare of the people in the north with consolidation of state authority, rebuilding and empowering of communities, revitalization of the economy and peace building and reconciliation. However, resettlement proved challenging due to a number of barriers to sustainable livelihoods in northern Uganda, contributing to a seventy percent unemployment rate among youth and this figure is much higher for female youth and those with disabilities.

We implemented a Landmine Survivors Returning Home Project funded by NORAD through Humanist Action for Human Rights (HAMU-Norway) 2007 to 2011. Landmine survivors identified as severely disadvantaged at the time were selected to benefit from the basic housing project. 22 houses were built in different communities where the final beneficiaries come from including 15 women and 7 men

The dream to study, qualify as a professional, work in government or private sector was taken away the fateful day he stepped on landmine on the footpath to his home.  

Living over 40 km in rural setting with no routine psychosocial support, remorseful, bitter and almost suicidal deterred him from continuing with school.

When age came he found a wife and started a family. He has children and even grandchildren. He is a peasant fortunate to rely of ox-ploughing for enhanced crop production. He is so thankful that the prosthesis enables him to effectively plough his way with the bulls like other persons without disabilities.

Special tribute to government partnership with AVSI facilitating the production and replacement of prosthesis for amputees requiring periodic assistive device

p2

“Trust me, prosthesis is not human limb even if it serves the purpose for our case. I always have to bear the pain of abrasion on my stub and entire left leg after ploughing with ox-plough. Do I have a choice? I do not?”

“I have a family and many mouths to feed. I do not have skills training to search for a job but farming is bread basket. As I continue to toil the earth, I expect government to meet us some where if we survivors will ever feel justice is being delivered.”

housing for survivors critical
survivors playing wheelchair basketball
adaptive sports for survivors

Suffering an amputation presents multiple problems for an individual, their family and friends. Psychological issues can be difficult to address and individuals can feel isolated leading to depression. Individuals following amputation at a low functional level often have to relearn how to perform daily activities with or without a prosthesis, and they tend to become more dependent on others, leading many amputees to experience decreased self-esteem. Others may return to a high functional level. Regardless, the rehabilitation care team must assess the functional and recreational goals of the patient to guide the treatment plan with the mission of creating an environment where there is no limit to what an amputee can accomplish.

Participation in varying activities has a profound effect on an amputee’s life. It has been shown that involvement in adaptive sports increases the quality of life for persons with disabilities by increasing self-esteem.

While not all persons with amputations will aspire to become elite athletes, those who participate in a sport and want to take their performance to the next level may find the maze of training and fitness information difficult to navigate. We were part of Uganda’s first Wheelchair Basketball team with two amputees male and female at the elite level playing Team Uganda East African Wheelchair Basketball Tournament, Kasarani 2019, Nairobi kenya.

Get Involved

Get Involved

It is a little over 15 years since the guns fell silent in Northern Uganda following the signing of peace talks between the government and the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) rebels in the Southern Sudan capital, Juba. But the scars are still fresh for many victims of the 20-year war. Most of these survivors used to reside with relatives or friends but major problems piled up upon their return to their homes in the villages where immediate survival needs formally catered for by national, international and non-governmental organizations were withdrawn. Survivors begun facing very difficult conditions with no special attention being given to their emotional and psychological needs. In light of the above, our establishment is needed to equip the majority of survivors in this post war-ravaged Northern Uganda cope with their emotional, psycho-social and economic needs.

 

The International Campaign to Ban Landmines and Cluster Munition is a huge success! Article 5 Mine Ban Treaty obligations, Mine Clearance achieved by Republic of Uganda coinciding with the Twelfth Meeting of States Parties (12MSP) December 2012.

46 mined areas covering 1.6km2 clearance operations found and destroyed 4,314 antipersonnel mines, 42 air bombs and 15 UXO. Additional 9,273 UXO and 20 antivehicle mine destroyed during operations.

Unfortunately, the total number of mine/ERW casualties in Uganda is not known. Estimates by December 2016, put it at 2,792 casualties (533 killed; 2,259 injured). 14 casualties were registered by December 2016. A recent study we carried out August to October 2021, disclosed a 69 year old lady injuries leading to right leg amputation.

As long as mines infest nations countless casualties leading to death, injuries, disabilities, destructions, mourning, and millions of dollars spent of reconstructions instead of sustainable global development.

Victim assistance enshrined in the two instruments of international humanitarian law, The Mine Ban Treaty (MBT) and the Convention on Cluster Munitions (CCM) remains the Achilles heels Uganda is yet to overcome.

Republic of Uganda is feeling like the Pearl of Africa again thanks to the International Campaign to Ban Landmines and Cluster Munition with generous support of affluent donors worldwide.

p2

Some survivors remain in dire need for routine medical rehabilitation and treatment begging for government to again prioritize budget allocation towards the orthopedic departments. Something like insurance card specifically for survivors to get professionally help from trained surgeons and not just general medical practioners.

what-is-happening-advocacy
stories of women survivors
p2

“I am 27 years old and believe my whole life is still for me to make. I cannot ask government to pay back my lost limb or messed up life. What am interested in however, is implore the government to critically evaluate the victim assistance clause enshrined in the International Mine Ban Treaty, which I was told obligates the State to look kindly on our affairs. I want to be able to use my hands, work, earn and put food in my family’s table. My children should be able to go to school beyond my level of education since my predicament prohibited me. “ 

Story of 1000 women survivors

Lost right foot and a baby brother riding on her back at 5 years from devastating landmines blast. Only started school thanks to a missionary benefactor who met her school dues primary through form three since her parents were equally wrestled down living in Internally Displaced Peoples (IDPs) camp early 2000s. Dropped out of school and would soon succumb to the pressure of being a girl-child experiencing so much withdrawn support. Found a young man and started a family. Regrettably, she separated last year and returned home with two children, boy 7 and girl 4 to live with widowed mother. Tilling the ground at a peasantry scale while eking a living.

Loss a limb an infant, five (5) years old going to fetch water at the well.  After successful surgery and other medical rehabilitation, was able to walk with the help of artificial limb provided by the Hospital.

Parents took her to boarding school because they desired quality education for her.  Recently completed Uganda Certificate of Education (U.C.E) at Koro Secondary School. Currently home helping family in the garden during this pandemic. Desire to join a vocational skills training in order to learn a trade that will provide occupation for future.

Growing up with limb loss was not so discomfiting in terms of her social life since her families, peers at school and community wholly accepted her the way she was.  She is hoping that she will be able to continue living positive even as she prepares to encounter uncharted territories entering adulthood. Disability and segregation she never had to face but has heard persons with disabilities express pain of discrimination.

p2

“It is not up to me, but my appeal to our government is to consider lending survivors of explosive ordnances and landmines a helping hand to cope with the difficult past we have gone through. “

education of girls survivors
artificial limb making
p2

“I appeal to government to improve on budget allocation to this orthopedic department so that prosthesis is available for replacement for survivors and new amputees we keep receiving from other causes.

I am currently renting in town proximal to work place but I do not own any piece of land or house where I can farm or retire to while on leave, holidays or host visiting in-laws.

We are pleased that the prosthesis keeps us upright but lost past cannot be forgotten until government can openly come and compensate us with land and some capital to start off a better living.”

People who recover psychologically from the traumatic accident move from pragmatic acceptance to what we call acceptance with resilience.  In contrast, people who do not recover psychologically from the traumatic accident move from pragmatic acceptance to what we term acceptance with resignation. They are resigned to the limb loss; feel depressed and bad about themselves. We have a handful of trained counselors who have had success handling high levels of trauma experienced from their peer in the community. Evidence of the resilience demonstrated by these survivors who accepted a fate of living without a limb and not committing suicide or going into depression is a vital indicator for our  confidence. These ones have become ably roles models and change makers for those who are weak and for new  cases of amputees struggling with accepting life of disability.

Henry an amputee himself, working with a Team of Technicians making, repairing and replacing artificial limbs (Prosthesis) enabling every patients is afforded a pair shoes when they receive services at Gulu Regional Referral Hospital.

Double amputee survivor wheels the streets of Anaka Town Northern Uganda to do welding and Fabrications in one of his workshops. Prior to Oscar’s accident, life was normal for the Family. At 18 years of age, while going home from the Internally Displaced Peoples camp in Olwyio, present day Nwoya district, Although it was 37 years ago last February 2, 2002 he remembers the way his life transformed then as intensely as though it happened yesterday.

Oscar opened the first welding workshop in Anaka Town in 2015, when there was no electricity. He trained over 70 youths who were on drugs, theft, hooliganism and transformed their lives over the past 6 years. Every wielding workshop owner in Anaka town was once his student making him a respectable figure in the industry. He owns two workshops where a couple of young men in Anaka town and Olwiyo Centre are employed. Oscar was elected a Councilor III Representative of Persons with Disabilities Olwiyo Sub County in the recently concluded general election 2021. He is ably looking after his family with returns from his different trades and engagement

p2

“A few years ago names of survivors were written down across Acholi Sub region with the hope of our plight being addressed by government. Twice these records were submitted to respectable personalites in government but attempt to get credible feedback were futile.”

Yes, we are trying to move on with our lives thanks to the medical and psychological rehabilitation 20 years or so ago. Some of us have prosthesis, crutches, wheelchairs, others crawl, and most of these devices provided by Non-governmental Organisations.

double amputee wielding
housing for survivors
p2

“It is not up to me, but my appeal to our government is to consider lending survivors of explosive ordnances and landmines a helping hand to cope with the difficult past we have gone through. “

The twenty years of conflict in northern Uganda left devastated the infrastructure, economy, and psyche of the population. With the restoration of peace, most people returned to their homes, further supported by the Government of Uganda’s Peace, Recovery, and Development Plan (PRDP) – a comprehensive strategy to improve the welfare of the people in the north with consolidation of state authority, rebuilding and empowering of communities, revitalization of the economy and peace building and reconciliation. However, resettlement proved challenging due to a number of barriers to sustainable livelihoods in northern Uganda, contributing to a seventy percent unemployment rate among youth and this figure is much higher for female youth and those with disabilities.

We implemented a Landmine Survivors Returning Home Project funded by NORAD through Humanist Action for Human Rights (HAMU-Norway) 2007 to 2011. Landmine survivors identified as severely disadvantaged at the time were selected to benefit from the basic housing project. 22 houses were built in different communities where the final beneficiaries come from including 15 women and 7 men

The dream to study, qualify as a professional, work in government or private sector was taken away the fateful day he stepped on landmine on the footpath to his home.  

Living over 40 km in rural setting with no routine psychosocial support, remorseful, bitter and almost suicidal deterred him from continuing with school.

When age came he found a wife and started a family. He has children and even grandchildren. He is a peasant fortunate to rely of ox-ploughing for enhanced crop production. He is so thankful that the prosthesis enables him to effectively plough his way with the bulls like other persons without disabilities.

Special tribute to government partnership with AVSI facilitating the production and replacement of prosthesis for amputees requiring periodic assistive device

p2

“Trust me, prosthesis is not human limb even if it serves the purpose for our case. I always have to bear the pain of abrasion on my stub and entire left leg after ploughing with ox-plough. Do I have a choice? I do not?”

“I have a family and many mouths to feed. I do not have skills training to search for a job but farming is bread basket. As I continue to toil the earth, I expect government to meet us some where if we survivors will ever feel justice is being delivered.”

housing for survivors critical
survivors playing wheelchair basketball
adaptive sports for survivors

Suffering an amputation presents multiple problems for an individual, their family and friends. Psychological issues can be difficult to address and individuals can feel isolated leading to depression. Individuals following amputation at a low functional level often have to relearn how to perform daily activities with or without a prosthesis, and they tend to become more dependent on others, leading many amputees to experience decreased self-esteem. Others may return to a high functional level. Regardless, the rehabilitation care team must assess the functional and recreational goals of the patient to guide the treatment plan with the mission of creating an environment where there is no limit to what an amputee can accomplish.

Participation in varying activities has a profound effect on an amputee’s life. It has been shown that involvement in adaptive sports increases the quality of life for persons with disabilities by increasing self-esteem.

While not all persons with amputations will aspire to become elite athletes, those who participate in a sport and want to take their performance to the next level may find the maze of training and fitness information difficult to navigate. We were part of Uganda’s first Wheelchair Basketball team with two amputees male and female at the elite level playing Team Uganda East African Wheelchair Basketball Tournament, Kasarani 2019, Nairobi kenya.